Chaplaincy Health Care Summer 2019 Newsletter

Summer weather may be just around the corner but our Summer newsletter just arrived and is chock-full of information. Our 2018 Annual Reports highlights the impact of our work and the tremendous role volunteers play throughout the agency. There’s also some dates and events you’ll want to mark on your calendar. We hope you’ll stop by and see us!


Chaplaincy Health Care Welcomes Daniel Lipparelli as Director of Development

Daniel Lipparelli

Chaplaincy Health Care is proud to announce and welcome Daniel Lipparelli as the Director of Development. Daniel will be managing all aspects of fundraising, development and philanthropic support, as well as, developing strategic and annual plans for the development department.

“We are really excited to have Daniel join our team,” said Gary Castillo, Chaplaincy Health Care’s Executive Director. “He brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the table that we can’t wait to tap into.”

Before joining Chaplaincy Health Care, Daniel spent 3 years as the Executive Director of the Edith Bishel Center for the Blind in Kennewick. Prior to that, Daniel was the founder and Executive Director of Transformed International in Kenya, Africa where he spent over eight years working with local communities on providing food, education and shelter for over 500 children, orphans and at-risk teen mothers. He was also the Country Director for SYMBIOS in Kenya, Africa. Daniel’s work in Africa required extensive fundraising, church support, grant writing, and non-profit leadership.

Daniel commented, “I am very familiar with the work of Chaplaincy Health Care in our community and I look forward to growing the development and community support efforts.”

Daniel serves on the board of directors for ReAct Kenya and as a volunteer advisor for Rehema for Kids, a Washington based non-profit meeting the needs of children in Kenya. Daniel, his wife and young son have lived in the Tri-Cities for the past three and a half years.


Frail is Not a Four-Letter Word

by Tim Ledbetter, D.Min, BCC
Chaplain Supervisor, Chaplaincy Health Care

There is a stage of life that may be dreaded more than the conclusion of one’s existence. It is that period of time when one finds him or herself becoming, in a word, FRAIL. Few people like that word; however, when a story is told describing someone’s increased fatigue, vulnerability and isolation, it inevitably seems to be summarized by the exclamation, “they are becoming so…uh…frail.” But at Chaplaincy Health Care, we believe that “frail” is not a four-letter word. Based on a four-stage model adapted from a book by Dennis McCullough*, we are fully aware of and responsive to the changes, losses and opportunities that are present at this particularly important stage of life.

Frail or Fatigue?

Increased fatigue is noticed as one’s once-robust vitality and energy is just not what it used to be. Statements like, “I’m just so tired,” are heard more frequently, along with reasons not to be as active as before. Be aware that fatigue may be of a physical, mental and/or social nature. Increased vulnerability also applies to different aspects of life: from the risk of falling to the risk of being taken advantage of by dishonest people. And increased isolation is often noticed with less frequent attendance at activities or more frequent excuses for not going or being involved. In reality all three aspects of increasing frailty are inter-related and affect each other. Interestingly, when comparing notes with some of the wonderful people who provide Meals on Wheels, they readily recognized these attributes in many of the folks they serve on a regular basis.

Stages of Life

Frailty is not something to be ashamed of or to ignore, but to understand and respond to with skillful compassion and patient empathy. In the continuum of life, the four stages noted above can be labeled as Routine, Stressed, Frail and Terminal. The Routine Stage is where we spend much of our lives (usually)—in the routines that we create, participate in and depend on day in and day out. Getting going in the morning, active at work or school, keeping schedules and appointments, worrying about being late, getting things done—in season and out of season. On occasion, those routines are interrupted by a stressful or distressing event that thrusts one into a Distressed Stage of life compromised for a time by accident, illness, injury, abuse. The natural response to being in a distressed stage is to seek to recover from and adapt to the changes that happened, with a goal of returning to one’s routines. Over time, those stressors become more frequent and prolonged; they start wearing on the person and at some point, the observation noted above begins to be heard, “They seem to be getting kind of frail.” (To complete the stages, eventually the declines and reductions are determined by medical experts to be irreversible and the likelihood of life ending in months and not years becomes real. Like the train station that receives passengers at the end of the journey, the final phase is called the Terminal Stage.)

"Frailty is not something to be ashamed of or to ignore, but to understand and respond to with skillful compassion and patient empathy"

Lessons Learned about Frailty

Students of the trajectory of human living have learned that a Frail Stage is not just for “old people.” Persons of all ages, including children, can become frail—just ask staff at children’s hospitals. Likewise we have learned that becoming frail is not a quiet, passive time; rather it is a constantly changing period of life that is characterized by another well-known, well-studied word, LOSS. We know this is so by listening to the stories on the theme of personal, functional loss: “I used to be able to do that and now I cannot ”… “I used to be this and now I am not.” Such situational losses—actually little “deaths”—must not be ignored. As with any loss, there are feelings of sorrow that must be sensed and respected. And there is grieving or mourning that must be done along the way in order to heal the fractures that occur in the hearts of the individual and those who love them.

Lastly we have learned that to be frail is not to be dying or dead—to put it bluntly.
Even though such despairing sentiments are often heard, the other reality is well-illustrated by the metaphorical testimony of autumn colors. The transitions from the vibrant greens and golds of summer to the browns and whites of winter are noticed by all—and feared by many. Like autumn, the Frail Stage embraces bittersweet times of joys and sorrows, of gains and losses, of wisdom and foolishness. The visual glories and declines are both evident in autumn and in the Frail Stage.

Generally there is no way around any of the stages, try as we might to avoid the reality of Life’s ebbs and flows, cycles and seasons. But in our self-sufficient, pro-growth, anti-aging society, the reality of the Frail Stage and our common angst about it continue to demand our best attention and responses. That begins with affirming that Frail is not a four-letter word.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tim Ledbetter has been with Chaplaincy Health Care for more than 24 years as a hospital and hospice chaplain. Tim is an ordained and endorsed American Baptist clergyman, a Board Certified Chaplain, and a life-long child of God. he has nurtured ongoing interests and participation in physician-chaplain collaboration, biomedical ethics, human subjects research, palliative care, and advanced care planning.


Planning for the Future – Your Decisions Matter

Planning is a part of life. There’s excitement in looking toward the future – college, career, a home, vacations – these are all instrumental components of life that are planned. Even still, after we have successfully accomplished educational goals, career milestones, we look forward to retirement and the enjoyment of the life we can live. However, the planning should not stop there.

April 16 is National Healthcare Decisions Day and was founded in 2007 by Nathan Kottkamp. Kottkamp completed his own advanced directive1 when he was 20 years old. He states, “It was empowering to know that my loved ones knew my wishes. I now know that I was an outlier to have created an advance directive when I was so young, but the fact is we all should discuss and document our health care wishes, regardless of our age or current health status.” At Chaplaincy Health Care, we encourage you to consider who you want to walk alongside you through your journey during the frail moments and final days. With this communication in place, you can have peace of mind you will be surrounded with the best care possible.

There are great resources available to help guide you through the conversation:

Start the conversation today and continue to live out life to the fullest in every way.

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1 Advanced Directives are legal documents that allow you to plan and make your own end-of-life wishes known in the event that you are unable to communicate.


Art is Healing

For hundreds, maybe even thousands, of years, artists have used their art to express human despair, find meaning in life and transcend their own emotional struggles. Even the most world-renowned artists have found relief from fears, anxiety, depression and found a new meaning in life through their artistic expression. Twentieth-century realist painter and printmaker, Edward Hopper, stated, “If I could say it in words there would be no reason to paint.”  Seattle artist and writer, Jaeda DeWalt encapsulates the value of healing artwork, “My art is largely made up of my pain; re-framed, redesigned and repurposed. It’s a mutually beneficial experience for both the creator and the beholder. Transformative healing is a beautiful process.” Creating artwork following a great loss can be therapeutic, helping to release pain, stress, and express emotions. When words become difficult to form in communicating the deep indescribable emotions, art can help you understand yourself better and help bring closure to grief.

"If Walls Could Talk"
An emotionally powerful room at Cork's Place utilizing free form paint. 15 years of grief and healing splattered on the walls and ceiling.

At Chaplaincy Cork’s Place, we know that there are times when grief has no words, especially for children and teens who may not know how to express the sadness and loss they are feeling. Cork’s Place, the only grief support facility in the Tri-City community specifically designed for children and teens, ages 3-17, offers a safe space to explore feelings of grief and loss in a variety of ways – and paint is a popular medium for many of them.

The 3rd Annual HeART of Healing benefit for Cork’s Place on Saturday, April 27 at the Uptown Theater in Richland features original artwork created by local children and teens, who have chosen to express or demonstrate what grief, loss and healing means to them. The fundraiser, to support this unique grief service for children, features an art exhibit, silent and live auction, raffle, live music performed by Gabe Knutzen, beverages, hors d’ouevres, and a moving program.

By attending HeART of Healing, you will experience, not only the pain but also the healing journey of grief through the eyes of a child. Unique and one-of-a-kind art pieces created by Cork’s Place kids will be on display and available for purchase.

"Hope Circles"
When all seems lost, hope binds us. Encircling our dreams and lifting us out of darkness. Into the light we go, hope guiding us; together.


Chaplaincy Health Care Spring 2019 Newsletter

Our Spring Newsletter is here! Tim Ledbetter, Chaplain Supervisor, sheds light on a dreaded stage of life: frailty. Read Ledbetter’s article to better understand how to respond to frailty with skillful compassion and patient empathy. Plus, save the dates for our upcoming events. Looking to volunteer? There are many opportunities to use your skills at Repeat Boutique, Hospice House and Cork’s Place.

Click here to read the Spring 2019 Newsletter.

Enjoy!


A Race in Honor of Cork’s Place

Jeff Kissel of Richland, WA has two goals to meet on April 27. One is to complete the 2019 Eugene Half-Marathon in Eugene, Oregon; the second is to raise $100 for each mile he runs so he can donate it to Cork’s Place, Chaplaincy Health Care’s grief program for children, teens and their families.

Jeff has been a supporter of Cork’s Place since he attended the first HeART of Healing fundraiser in 2017. This year the fundraiser falls on the same weekend as the race, making it impossible for him to attend the event. However, the Eugene Marathon's efforts to support other charitable organizations inspired Jeff to combine his passions for running and Chaplaincy Cork’s Place as best he could from afar.

Jeff hopes to raise a total of $1,310. Donations can be made through his GoFundMe page at https://www.gofundme.com/jeff-runs-for-corks-place-heart-of-healing

The 3rd Annual HeART of Healing event is on Saturday, April 27th at the Uptown Theater in Richland. The fundraiser features original artwork created by local grieving children and teens, an art exhibit, silent and live auctions, raffle, live music performed by Gabe Knutzen, beverages, hors d’ouevres, and a moving program.

Tickets to HeART of Healing are available for purchase online at https://chaplaincyhealthcare.org/event/heartofhealing2019/


Updated: Winter Storm Closure Information

Due to continual Winter Storm conditions Chaplaincy Health Care is implementing the following service modifications and closures for Thursday, February 14th.

  • Hospice – We continue to accept referrals, intakes and admissions.
  • In-Home Hospice: We are available 24/7 and are committed to getting to our patients no matter what the road conditions are. Patients and families please call your RN case manager directly if any needs should arise during regular office hours (8 am to 5 pm), or after 5 pm call (509) 783-7416 and your call will be routed to someone who can help.
  • Hospice House: Open
  • Palliative Care: Scheduled visits are being made as roads become more accessible. Nurses are available by phone.
  • Contract Chaplains: Chaplain availability will be determined based on each site’s needs and our ability to access the site.
  • Behavioral Health: Appointments are being rescheduled as needed. Clients will be contacted if their therapist cannot make it to the office.
  • Cork’s Place: Closed. No groups Thursday, Feb. 14. Tours and in-take meetings will be rescheduled.
  • Grief Care: No support groups Thursday, Feb.14. Gone Too Soon group canceled for tonight.
  • Repeat Boutique: Kennewick open limited hours and Richland closed.

We are available 24/7 for our hospice and palliative care patients and families to ensure they receive the care they need. If you have a question about a service or closure, please email info@chaplaincyhealthcare.org and your message will be forwarded to the appropriate person.


Winter Storm Closure Information

Due to Winter Storm conditions Chaplaincy Health Care is implementing the following Emergency Action Plan for Monday, February 11th and Tuesday, February 12th.

  • In-Home Hospice: In-home visits for Monday 2/11 and Tuesday 2/12 will be rescheduled. Emergency needs will be addressed as soon as possible. Patients and families please call your RN case manager directly if any needs should arise, or call (509) 783-7416 and your call will be routed to someone who can help.
  • Hospice House: Open
  • Palliative Care: Scheduled visits for Monday 2/11 are being rescheduled. Nurses are available by phone.
  • Contract Chaplains: Chaplain availability will be determined based on each sites needs and our ability to access the site.
  • Behavioral Health: Closed. Appointments are being rescheduled. The Step-Up program is canceled for Tuesday 2/12.
  • Cork’s Place: Closed. No groups Monday 2/11 or Tuesday 2/12. Tours and in-take meetings will be rescheduled.
  • Grief Care: No support groups Monday 2/11 or Tuesday 2/12.
  • Repeat Boutique: Kennewick and Richland closed.

We will have limited staff on hand but will make every effort to ensure our hospice and palliative care patients and families receive the care they need. If you have a question about a service or closure, please email info@chaplaincyhealthcare.org and your message will be forwarded to the appropriate person.


Support for Grief this Winter

Some choose to attend a group soon after a loss, while others may wait years. Wherever you are in the healing process, Chaplaincy Grief Care is there to help. We invite you to come and join others who are on the same journey.

We offer a handful of drop-in groups, one-time classes, and 10-week support groups. Drop-in groups do not require a weekly commitment and may have new participants each week. These groups are great as they offer you flexibility. Groups and classes are open to anyone experiencing grief due to a death. All groups and classes are free of charge but do require registration.

Call us, we can help.

View all groups and classes here.